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Detailed Fitting Instruction

Home : Boots : Ordering : Detalied Fitting Instructions

Order/Measuring Form

Download the Order/Measuring Form

Introduction

Thank you for selecting this page to learn to fit Harlick Skating Boots.

This is provided as a supplement for the "Instructions for Measurements" found on the front of the Harlick Order Form.

Inside every pair of good fitting skating boots is a happy skater. And a skating boot that fits well, is always the result of someone that did a proper fitting.

There are times when we get phone calls from skaters who have received their new boots, only to try them on and find that they do not fit. Too short, too narrow, too wide or too long. Sometimes this can not be helped because everyone has their own preference as to how they like a boot to fit. Some prefer a roomy fit and others a snug fit. The ideal way to determine the best fit for each skater is to try on several pair of stock boots until you find your preferred fit. But this is not always practical because there may not be a local shop that carries a full range of sizes to try. So we are left with doing detailed fittings consisting of a tracings and circumference measurements of the feet.

Each company that manufactures skating boots has their own way of doing a fitting. Some want the measurements done while standing and others want it done in a sitting position. And some will want a combination of both, as Harlick does. It is important that you do the measurements according to the manufacturers specifications. To do otherwise will result in an improper fit.

Be sure to click on the linked text to see example photos or other information.

Things To Remember

The first thing to do is review the Measuring Form Instructions. These are very specific instructions that must be followed. Some that are overlooked at times are:

  • Use ONLY a regular #2 pencil. Harlick's size calculations are calibrated to the diameter of a regular #2 pencil. Using a pen or other writing instrument, could add or subtract a ½ size from the tracing.
  • While keeping the side of a #2 pencil in contact with the side of the foot, making sure that the pencil remains in a vertical position, trace the outline of the foot with a #2 pencil while the skater is sitting. Then before the foot is moved have the skater stand and trace the outline of the foot again while standing. This shows us the expansion of the foot when weight is added. It will also show if there is any pronation or if the skater has flat arches. But most important, These outlines determine the length of the boots. If you only do one outline tracing, we will not know if it was done sitting or stand. This could result in a boot being too long.
  • Take the CIRCUMFERENCE measurements of the foot with a cloth tape-measure, in a SITTING position with the foot resting flat on the floor. While seated, the knee should be bent to approximately a 90 degree angle with only normal leg weight added. Circumference, means all the way around the total diameter of each location, the ball, instep, heel, ankle and leg. The ball measurement will determine the width of the boots. While measuring, the tape should be pulled snug, not tight or loose.
  • All measurements and tracings must be taken with the skater wearing the type of sock or tights that they will wear when they skate in their boots.
  • Do not attempt to trace your own feet. This does not work. While leaning forward to reach down and draw the outline, your weight is improperly balanced.

These instructions may sound simple and logical, but there are still times when we receive order forms with some very strange looking outlines, and impossible measurements. When this happens we will attempt to contact the fitter and discuss what needs to be done.

After you have reviewed the Order Form, please answer all questions completely. The name of the skater is a must. All of the requested information is used to help us determine the best size, model, and options that will best suit their needs. The age, height and weight are very important, as well as the skill level of the skater. The skater's history will tell us the size and model of boots currently used and how they performed for you. If the skater has ever had Harlick Boots before we can refer to the previous order. Using this information will help us to determine the best model and options for each individual skater. No two skaters are alike and we want each skater to get what is best for them.

Fitting Instructions - For a Stock Boot

Begin by taking the first tracing, with the skater in a seated position, the knee bent to approximately a 90 degree angle with only normal leg weight added. Then, BEFORE THE FOOT IS MOVED, have the skater stand and take a second tracing starting from the inside ankle bone, around the toes, to the outside ankle bone. The standing tracing shows us the expansion of the foot when weight is put on it (This tracing was done using a #2 pencil but then traced over with a marker to darken for reproduction purposes. Please, only use a #2 pencil.) Notice that there is only one line for each outline, sitting and standing. Please trace the outline of each position only once. Several tracings of each position can add or subtract one half to a full size to the length of the tracing.

  • A hint for drawing around the heels. Start your outline by reaching around the heel to one side, and then draw around the heel. This will eliminate a double line at the back of the heel which can make it difficult for sizing.

Next take the various circumference measurements as shown on the measuring form. The CIRCUMFERENCE MEASUREMENTS should be taken carefully, and double checked for accuracy. While the skater is seated, the foot should rest on the floor in a relaxed position, with only the legs weight added to the foot. The tape should be pulled snug, not tight, while measuring. The most important measurement is the "Ball" measurement. This measurement is used to determine the width of the boots. Take the ball measurement around the widest part of the foot. Place the tape measure so that it crosses directly over the joint behind the large toe (often referred to as the bunion) and the joint just behind the small toe. This will usually cause the tape to be positioned at an angle.

That is all that is needed to determine the size for a stock boot. There will be times when we may notice something that we know will cause problems in fit with a stock boot and may suggest custom boots for the skaters.

Some things to consider when determining if a stock boot will work or not are:

  • Is the lace opening going to be too wide or too narrow for the ankle and calf area?
  • Is one foot larger than the other?
  • Does the shape of the foot require too many modifications to the boot to make it fit?

The difference in cost from a stock boot to a custom in most cases is not that significant and it would be wise to purchase the custom.

See the Stock Sizing Chart to help you determine stock sizes, or mail to us for size calculation.

For Custom Fittings

First you must position the skater for a good tracing. Have the skater sit on the edge of a chair with the foot resting flat on the measuring form. The knee should be bent to approximately a 90 degree angle and the knee positioned directly over the top of the instep. Do not let the skater move the leg from this position while tracing the foot. Make sure the pencil will not hit the calf when tracing around the heel.

Begin by taking the first tracing, with the skater in a seated position, then BEFORE THE FOOT IS MOVED, have the skater stand and take a second tracing starting from the inside ankle bone, around the toes, to the outside ankle bone. Be sure to have the skater shift most of their weight to the leg that is being traced. Also have them bend the knee slightly to shift some of the weight to the ball of the foot. If they are wobbling, trying to balance, then they have too much weight on the foot being traced. The standing tracing shows us the expansion of the foot when weight is put on it. It will also show if the skater has pronation or supination. (example tracing) (This tracing was done using a #2 pencil but then traced over with a marker to darken for reproduction purposes. Please, only use a #2 pencil.) Notice that there is only one line for each outline, sitting and standing. Please trace the outline of each position only once. Several tracings of each position can add one half to a full size to the length of the tracing.

  • A hint for drawing around the heels. Start your outline by reaching around the heel to one side, and then draw around the heel. This will eliminate a double line at the back of the heel which can make it difficult for sizing.

Next take the various circumference measurements as shown on the measuring form. The CIRCUMFERENCE MEASUREMENTS should be taken carefully, and double checked for accuracy. The tape should be pulled snug, not tight, while measuring. The foot should rest on the floor in a relaxed position, with only the legs weight added to the foot. The most important measurement is the "Ball" measurement. This measurement is used to determine the width of the boots. Take the ball measurement around the widest part of the foot. Place the tape measure so that it crosses directly over the joint behind the large toe (often referred to as the bunion) and the joint just behind the small toe. This will usually cause the tape to be positioned at an angle.

For the instep measurement place the tape so that it is at the apex of the arch and wrap it around the top of the instep.

For the heel the tape should be placed from the back, lower part of the heel and wrap up and under the ankle bones to the top of the instep.

Place the tape around the leg so that it is just above the top of the inside ankle bone for the ankle measurement.

For the top measurement, measure up the back of the leg from the base of the heel to the height that you want the top of the boot to go. Then measure around the leg at that point for the circumference measurement. Tell us the height that you want the boot to go up the back of the leg.

If you have access to a "RITZ" measuring stick, take a measurement of the heel and record the width in inches on the tracing near the heel. Also measure the length of the foot, sitting and standing, and record each at the top of the tracing in inches.

If there is anything unusual about the foot, i.e.: heel spurs on the back of the heel, large bunions, hammer toes, tailor bunion, cuboid bone, navicular bone at the arch, narrow Achilles tendons, large ankle bones, or any other protruding bones or tender spots. Please make a note of these on the charts special instructions area. Describe the location with cross measurements so that we may provide for this in the design of the boots. Also mark an "X" on the outline of the foot where they occur. Explain any current fit problems that the skater may be experiencing. Photos are also very helpful in depicting the structure of the foot. While standing, take pictures of bare feet from all five angles. Front, rear, top, left and right side views.

Remember that you can never give us too much information. In this case, more is better.

Note that Foot Molds are not used for determining the size of boots, but are used for making skating orthotics if needed. Some full foot Dr. casts in a positive mold can be helpful to determine abnormal bone positions or other foot problems. Contact us first to see if this will be helpful.

After The Fitting

When you place your order, please make sure you have stated clearly on the Order Form what boot options the skater wants. Such as choice of leather, padding, stiffness, and other options to be included. Please refer to the Custom or Stock price lists and the Custom or Stock Option lists for descriptions and uses of the different models and options. Go to Price Menu.

The Harlick Skating Boot FAQ's will help you determine which options are best for each individual.

A deposit must accompany all orders. No orders will be processed until a deposit is received. The deposit should be $200.00 U.S. for Custom orders and $100.00 U.S. for Stock orders. If you send in an order and you do not receive a confirmation copy of the invoice, please check with us, as all orders are confirmed. If you have not received your confirmation within three weeks, we may not have received the order.

Please review the General Information, for more ordering information.

Thanks for being concerned enough to have reviewed this document.

Remember, when you do a good job, it helps us do a better job.

Thank You!